Archive for julio, 2005



Ambassador Rycroft Visits ICMP Facilities and Announces Further Funding

martes, julio 26th, 2005

Following the Srebrenica anniversary, the British Ambassador in BiH, Matthew Rycroft, visited forensic facilities of the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) in Tuzla today. Accompanied by the ICMP Chief of Staff, Kathryne Bomberger, Ambassador Rycroft toured the ICMP Podrinje Identification Project and Identification Coordination Division in Tuzla, and the ICMP Re-association Center in Lukavac. The Ambassador announced that the British Government will donate more than 1.1 million BAM this year as part of their continual commitment to ICMP.
“Today, I witnessed first hand the incredible technological strides that have been made to identify the missing,” said Ambassador Rycroft. “Through the use of DNA, ICMP has provided accurate identifications. These provide irrefutable evidence of a person’s identity, and so give individual family members a sense of closure. This accuracy also provides political neutrality, which is important in a politically charged environment where precise numbers of missing persons are still disputed.”
Praising the BiH Government for its ground-breaking work in passing a Law on Missing Persons, Ambassador Rycroft urged the Government to ensure the law was fully implemented, living up to its legal obligations to seek the truth and enabling family members to benefit from the law’s provisions. He also commended the BiH authorities for demonstrating the political will to establish a Missing Persons Institute at the state level, but noted that the protocol that will officially launch the State level Institute still awaits formal approval by the Council of Ministers.
ICMP created the Missing Persons Institute in August 2000 and has since worked with the BiH authorities and all stakeholders to ensure the Institute can be formally established at the State level.
“ICMP has provided Bosnia and Herzegovina and other states in the former Yugoslavia with revolutionary technological tools to assist them in meeting their legal and moral obligations to their citizens”, said Kathryne Bomberger, ICMP Chief of Staff. “We are also working with Governments to ensure they responsibly address the issue of missing persons, regardless of ethnic, religious or national origin.”
Some 30,000 persons went missing during the conflicts in BiH and between 15,000 and 20,000 persons are still unaccounted for.

Ireland Contributes to ICMP Funding

lunes, julio 25th, 2005

The International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) has received a contribution from the Government of Ireland towards its work in the former Yugoslavia. The 150,000 Euro contribution was the first installment of a two-year commitment made by the Government of Ireland; Ireland has pledged to make a contribution of the same amount in 2006.The Government of Ireland has been a valued supporter of the activities of ICMP, which assists governments in addressing missing persons issues, since 2002.

ICMP is an international organization funded entirely by donor governments and foundations. This financial assistance enables the work of ICMP’s forensic anthropologists and archeologists at mass grave sites, of scientists in the ICMP laboratories extracting DNA profiles from bones and family members’ blood samples for identification of the missing, and of other ICMP programs that assist family members of missing persons and local governments.

ICMP activities are also supported by the Governments of the United States of America, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Greece and the Holy See, and by the European Union.

Holy See Contributes to ICMP Funding

viernes, julio 15th, 2005

A contribution from the Holy See this morning is the latest addition to funding for the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP).The Holy See has been a valued supporter of the activities of ICMP, which assists governments in addressing missing persons issues, since 2002.

ICMP is an international organization funded entirely by donor governments and foundations. This financial assistance enables the work of ICMP’s forensic anthropologists and archeologists at mass grave sites, of scientists in the ICMP laboratories extracting DNA profiles from bones and family members’ blood samples for identification of the missing, and of other ICMP programs that assist family members of missing persons and local governments.

“The importance of this support goes well beyond the material value of the donation itself and shows the missing persons’ family members that the international community still attaches significance to the issue of the missing in the region of the former Yugoslavia,” said Kathryne Bomberger, ICMP Chief of Staff.

ICMP activities are also supported by the Governments of the United States of America, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Sweden, Finland, Ireland, Germany and Greece, and by the European Union.